Kjetil Mulelid Trio - southportjazz2019
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Kjetil Mulelid Trio

£20.00

Start: Saturday 2nd February 2.30pm – 5.00pm
Venue: Royal Clifton Hotel, Southport PR8 1RB

 

Kjetil Mulelid Trio consist of some of Norway’s most interesting jazz musicians that are involved in projects like “Hegge” (Norwegian Grammy Award winner 2017), “Megalodon Collective” (Norwegian Grammy Award nomination 2016, and winner of JazzIntro 2016), “Wako” and the “Trondheim Jazz Orchestra”.

 

Watch Kjetil Mulelid Trio – Leaving Home
Watch Kjetil Mulelid Trio – Childrens Song

 

“Children’s Song”, with a title nodding towards Chick Corea, is less complex but no less beautiful with its wistful piano melodies, sensitively brushed drums and melodic bass interjections. Again there’s something of a hint of Jarrett in Mulelid’s soloing as the music gradually gathers a degree of momentum. TheJazzMann (UK)

 

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Description

Kjetil Mulelid Trio consist of some of Norway’s most interesting jazz musicians that are involved in projects like “Hegge” (Norwegian Grammy Award winner 2017), “Megalodon Collective” (Norwegian Grammy Award nomination 2016, and winner of JazzIntro 2016), “Wako” and the “Trondheim Jazz Orchestra”.

 

They play modern acoustic jazz, and the music is a mixture of compositions written by Mulelid and pure collective improvisations. “The music is simple, beautiful and well composed tunes which goes in and out of expressive improvisations” (Olav Opsvik, NO). “The compositions reflects Mulelid’s rich and melodic play” (Eyal Hareuveni, IS). The trio have since 2016 toured three times in West-Europe and played concerts on some of Norway’s biggest jazz scenes, recorded some great live videos and released their debut album “Not Nearly Enough To Buy A House” which got honoured world wide by critics:

“Best of the year” – Jez Nelson, Jazz FM (UK)

 

“These pieces contain moments of genuine beauty” – TheJazzMann (UK)

 

“They mixes together sparse zen-funk and folk song-based vernaculars” – Selwyn Harris , Jazzwise (UK)

 

“As pretty and elegant as something Bill Evans trio might have performed at the Village Vanguard” -Ron Schepper, Textura (CA)

 

Kjetil A Mulelid – Piano
Andreas Winther – Drums
Bjørn Marius Hegge – Double Bass

 

From Jazzhalo

 

Q: Who are your major influences?

 

Marius: ‘I only have minor influences! (General laughter). No, seriously: for me as a bass player, Charlie Haden is the name that comes to my mind.’

 

Kjetil: ‘Tough question… I would mention early Keith Jarrett stuff, amongst others. But not one musician in particular, because it’s a huge mixture of influences.’

 

Andreas: ‘Concerning the piano trio in itself, I would certainly call Paul Bley/Paul Motian/Gary Peacock as an influence. But we also listen to a lot of Norwegian music. And to a lot of non-Norwegian music as well!’

 

Kjetil: ‘As a – really mixed – trio, we have undergone many influences. That’s what makes it interesting, because each and every one of us has lots of ideas about what’s cool and what isn’t.

 

Andreas: ‘Those influences are what makes us sound this particular way.’

 

Kjetil: ‘I would never be able to start a piano trio to pretend we sound like another trio: we don’t want to sound like another piano trio!’

 

Q: So you wouldn’t consider yourselves a “jazz piano trio” in the classic sense of the word?

 

Andreas: ‘The fact that we play acoustic makes us a “classic” jazz piano trio; the setting is clearly similar, obviously.’

 

Kjetil: ‘But other piano trios do not play the same way we do. Because we really have our very own philosophy and personal way how to approach modern acoustic jazz.’